Demo: Last Gasp Art Laboratories Super Oscillo Fuzz & Gommorah

Years ago, there was some store in Sacramento (where fellow reviewer in this video, Nick Reinhart, hails from) that sold pedals and had the advantage of also providing audio clips. I bought a few winners, and a few losers from them, but the clear winner out of all my purchases from that store was the Last Gasp Art Laboratories Super Oscillo Fuzz! This pedal delivers so much sound, fuzz, dirt, oscillation, and feedback that any noise freak would love. Last Gasp was also gracious enough to send us a Gommorah, so here is a Pedals And Effects review of these two awesome pedals. 

Photo credit: Last Gasp Art Laboratories

Photo credit: Last Gasp Art Laboratories

The Super Oscillo Fuzz has lots of switches for a massive variety of fuzz tones, and it comes in the coolest little stomp box format. I really love flipping the switches and landing on a bomb of a sound that breaks up into a million pieces. Hiro, designer/builder at Last Gasp, definitely knows noise and dirt tones. He hails from Japan, but lives in Sydney, Australia and his pedals have a great reputation for being unique, bullet proof (I toured with this pedal in Mars Voltaand most importantly, musical. I have a few friends who have borrowed this pedal and they all love it and continue to borrow it!

Photo credit: Last Gasp Art Laboratories

Photo credit: Last Gasp Art Laboratories

Now the Gomorrah is a new acquisition that I picked up when I was in Sydney on tour with Deltron 3030. Hiro booked a show at a venue in the city and a bunch of great Australian musicians and I got out there. After the show, Hiro hooked me up with the Gomorrah and his great Misty Cave (which is currently out on loan) pedals. The Gomorrah is insanely heavy!

The Gomorrah is not just an ordinary fuzz. This fuzz is an input sensitive subharmonic fuzz which can create a synthetic lower octave sound. Here's how it works:

The pitch of the octave sound depends on the intensity of the input (instrument) signal. The basic idea is that if the input signal is strong, the input pitch is output (fuzz). When the output is less than strong, a pitch of one octave down is created. Now if the output is weak, then a two octave down sound is generated. The pitch steps are caused by the input signal and it acts as a random arpeggiator. Crazy, right?!

Here is Nick Reinhairt's and my video of us playing Last Gasp Art Laboratories pedals way better than we could ever explain it!